Grammar

Syllable Structure

Now that you know the basics of Hangul, let’s look at syllable structure.
Unlike other writing systems, Hangul is written syllable by syllable, or by ‘blocks’.

Take a look at the following: How many ‘blocks’ do you think there are in 안녕하세요?

If you answered ‘5’, you are correct!
Each of these ‘blocks’ is letters put together in syllables in order to make up one word: an-nyeong-ha-sae-yo.

Syllables ALWAYS start with a consonant (C), which is then followed by a vowel(V):
● C + V
Examples: 가, 우, 네, 르, 캐

The two-character configuration is only the minimum amount of letters needed to create a ‘block’.
● C + V + C
The last consonant is known as the ‘batchim’ and it will always appear under the first consonant:
Examples: 람, 신, 물, 원, 한

The last syllable structure which is essential to know is C + V + CC.
Sometimes the ‘batchim’ will consist of two consonants instead of one. If you were to ever see this type of syllable structure, you would only pronounce the first letter of the ‘batchim’ and you would drop the other letter:
● C + V + CC
Examples: 값, 몫
There are a few fixed sets of double consonants that appear together as
‘patchim’ – ㄳ, ㄶ, ㄻ, ㄽ, ㄿ, ㅄ, ㄵ, ㄺ, ㄼ, ㄾ, ㅀ (not including consonants like ㄲ,ㄸ).

Now that you know the basics of Hangul, let’s look at syllable structure.
Unlike other writing systems, Hangul is written syllable by syllable, or by ‘blocks’.

Take a look at the following: How many ‘blocks’ do you think there are in 안녕하세요?

If you answered ‘5’, you are correct!
Each of these ‘blocks’ is letters put together in syllables in order to make up one word: an-nyeong-ha-sae-yo.

Syllables ALWAYS start with a consonant (C), which is then followed by a vowel(V):
● C + V
Examples: 가, 우, 네, 르, 캐

The two-character configuration is only the minimum amount of letters needed to create a ‘block’.
● C + V + C
The last consonant is known as the ‘batchim’ and it will always appear under the first consonant:
Examples: 람, 신, 물, 원, 한

The last syllable structure which is essential to know is C + V + CC.

Sometimes the ‘batchim’ will consist of two consonants instead of one. If you were to ever see this type of syllable structure, you would only pronounce the first letter of the ‘batchim’ and you would drop the other letter:
● C + V + CC
Examples: 값, 몫
There are a few fixed sets of double consonants that appear together as ‘patchim’ – ㄳ, ㄶ, ㄻ, ㄽ, ㄿ, ㅄ, ㄵ, ㄺ, ㄼ, ㄾ, ㅀ (not including consonants like ㄲ,ㄸ).

Exercises:

Here, I will be giving you the romanization in simple words. With this information given, try to write the word in Hangul. Don’t worry if you don’t get it at first! Practice makes perfect!
● Oppa – Hangul: ______________
● Saranghaeyo – Hangul: ______________
● Appa – Hangul: ______________
● Juseyo- Hangul: ______________

Remember to keep reviewing your Hangul, and make sure to practice asmuch as possible!